Monkeypox | Washington State Department of Health – Washington State Department of Health

Monkeypox FAQs
In the United States: For U.S. Cases.
Internationally: For global cases.
Update 8/3/2022: 166 people in Washington state have tested positive for orthopoxvirus, including one person who was exposed in another state, but tested positive in Washington. All positive cases of orthopoxvirus are considered likely monkeypox.
Data is updated Monday-Friday
County
Number of cases
If you have had close contact with a person who has confirmed or probable monkeypox, getting vaccine promptly may prevent an infection. Close contact can include being together for several hours, hugging, cuddling, kissing, or sharing a bed.
Contact your healthcare provider or the county health department for information.
You can spread monkeypox from the start of symptoms until the rash has fully healed, which can take two to four weeks. To keep from spreading the infection:
If you have severe pain or a rash that is spreading on your body, you may need antiviral treatment. Have your health care provider call your county health department for information.
Vaccination is not recommended for someone who was exposed and developed disease symptoms.
You can spread monkeypox from the start of symptoms until the rash has fully healed, which can take two to four weeks.
To keep from spreading the infection:
If you have having severe pain or a rash that is spreading on your body, you may need antiviral treatment. Have your healthcare provider call your county health department for information.
Vaccination is not recommended for someone who was exposed and developed disease symptoms. If indicated, anti-viral treatment is more effective. 
Transmission of monkeypox requires close interaction with a symptomatic individual. Brief interactions that do not involve physical contact and healthcare interactions conducted using appropriate protective equipment are not high risk.
The monkeypox virus can be transmitted from person to person by:
direct contact with the skin or body fluids of an infected person (including sexual contact), or contact with virus-contaminated objects (such as bedding or clothing), or respiratory droplets during direct and prolonged face-to-face contact.
People with a confirmed case of monkeypox are contagious as soon as they develop symptoms and continue to be contagious until the scabs fall off the rash. A person with monkeypox should isolate from others until the scabs fall off.
Humans can also get monkeypox from contact with infected animals.
Monkeypox can cause flu-like symptoms, swollen lymph nodes, and a rash that can appear anywhere on the body. In the current outbreak, many cases have presented with lesions on the genitals or in the anal area. Some people have initially had rectal pain, with or without flu-like symptoms. Some people may not have any symptoms prior to the start of the rash.
Rash will turn into raised bumps, which then fill with fluid. The rash eventually scabs over, and the scabs fall off. Typically, the rash is mostly on the face, arms, legs, and hands. However, if a person was infected during sexual contact, the rash might only be on the genitals. If a person was infected through anal sex, they may develop anal or rectal irritation.
The incubation period (time from exposure to the start of symptoms) for monkeypox is usually 7-14 days but can range from 5-21 days.
Most people recover in 2-4 weeks, but the disease can be serious, especially for immunocompromised people, children, and pregnant people.
People who may have symptoms of monkeypox should contact their healthcare provider. Before the visit, they should notify their healthcare provider that they are concerned about monkeypox, and whether they recently had close contact with a person who had a similar rash or a person who has been diagnosed with monkeypox.
Anyone can get monkeypox, but some people are at a higher risk. Unlike the virus that causes COVID-19, monkeypox is primarily spread through close contact and does not spread through the air over longer distances. Brief interactions that do not involve physical contact and health care interactions conducted using appropriate protective equipment are generally considered low risk.
While the current cases nationally and internationally mainly involve men who have sex with men, anyone who is sexually active with multiple partners or who are partners with someone who has sex with multiple partners can be at risk for being exposed to monkeypox.
Other risk factors may include travel to areas where monkeypox is spreading, close, non-sexual contact with a known case, or contact with sick animals. To protect yourself and others from monkeypox or sexual infectious diseases, DOH recommends practicing safe sex methods, practice harm reduction, and avoiding sexual contact with anyone who has open wounds, sores, or rashes
Controlling the outbreak is possible. Monkeypox is not COVID – it is mostly spread through close, skin-to-skin contact, and is far less likely to be spread in the air.
A probable case is someone who tests positive for orthopoxvirus (a group of viruses that includes monkeypox and smallpox) and negative for smallpox. The Washington State Public Health Laboratories and some clinical laboratories can do this testing.
A confirmed case is someone who tests positive for monkeypox virus.
In Washington state, we begin treatment, case investigation, and contact tracing as soon as someone gets a test result that identifies them as a probable or confirmed case.
Mammals can get monkeypox virus. Here’s how to prevent spreading the virus to animals.
We encourage anyone who has a rash and thinks they may have had close, skin-to-skin contact with someone who could have monkeypox in the last 21 days to talk to their medical provider and find out if they should be tested.
Monkeypox is a rare viral disease. Infection can spread from certain animals to humans, and also from one person to another.
Chickenpox is a very contagious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus.
Measles is a very contagious disease caused by a virus.
Monkeypox was discovered in 1958 when two outbreaks of a pox-like disease occurred in colonies of monkeys kept for research.
Despite being named “monkeypox,” the source of the disease remains unknown. However, African rodents and non-human primates (like monkeys) might harbor the virus and infect people.
The monkeypox virus can be spread from person to person by:
People who do not have monkeypox symptoms cannot spread the virus to others.
At this time, it is not known if monkeypox can spread through semen or vaginal fluids.
People who get monkeypox are contagious as soon as they develop symptoms and continue to be contagious until the scabs fall off the rash. A person with monkeypox should isolate from others until the scabs fall off.
There are two types of monkeypox virus: West African and Congo Basin. Infections in the current outbreak are from the West African type.
Infections with the type of monkeypox virus identified in the 2022 outbreak—the West African type—are rarely fatal.
If you suspect you have monkeypox, isolate yourself from others in a single person room if available and immediately consult your health care provider.
There is no particular age group that is more vulnerable to monkeypox than others.
However, people with weakened immune systems, children under 8 years of age, people with a history of eczema, and people who are pregnant or breastfeeding may be more likely to get seriously ill or die.
Public health officials encourage anyone who has symptoms of monkeypox, or anyone who has been in close contact with someone diagnosed with monkeypox in the last 21 days, to contact a health care provider to see if they should be tested. Providers should have a high level of suspicion if patients present with a rash, especially if they also report recent sexual or close contact with a possible case.
Infections with the strain of monkeypox virus identified in this outbreak are rarely fatal. Most do not require hospitalization. To date, no one in the U.S. has died of monkeypox.
People infected with the virus usually recover in two to four weeks, but the disease can be serious, especially for immunocompromised people, children, people with a history of eczema, or people who are pregnant or breastfeeding.
The good news is that Washington state has no shortage of testing capacity for monkeypox. The Washington State Public Health Laboratory (PHL) has been able to test every suspect case that medical providers in our state have reported to their local health departments. In addition, commercial labs such as University of Washington, LabCorp, and Quest are now able to test for monkeypox.
Yes. Here’s how testing currently works in our state:
There is no shortage of testing in Washington state.
Orthopoxvirus testing is done by the Washington State Public Health Laboratories and specific clinical laboratories.
antiviral medications are used to treat monkeypox.
To help stop the spread of monkeypox virus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced plans to distribute a limited amount of a vaccine called JYNNEOS in the US, including to Washington state. Because there is a very limited supply of this vaccine, Washington has received a very small amount of vaccine so far (Washington received less than 400 courses during Phase I).
The federal government is allocating vaccine in three phases based on the number of cases in each state. The majority of Phase I and 2 doses are being sent to local health jurisdictions and will be used to vaccinate high- and intermediate-risk close contacts of confirmed and probable cases (a strategy called “post-exposure prophylaxis”).
A small number of doses will also be given as pre-exposure vaccination to high-risk workers who test monkeypox samples, such as lab workers.  Local health jurisdictions may also use remaining vaccine to vaccinate other people who are at high risk for contracting monkeypox. With the current limited amount of vaccine in Washington, there are no plans to hold mass vaccination clinics. Most healthcare providers do not have access to the vaccine yet.
Washington expects to receive a larger supply of vaccine in late August (Phase 3). How vaccine will be divided up, and who in Washington will be able to receive it, will depend on how much vaccine the state receives and where cases are located.
For now, if you believe you have had recent close contact with someone who was diagnosed with monkeypox and need a vaccine, please reach out to your healthcare provider.
For people who have had recent contact with someone who tested positive for monkeypox, the vaccine can reduce the chance of developing a monkeypox infection. Considerations for Monkeypox Vaccination | Monkeypox | Poxvirus | CDC
Two currently licensed vaccines, JYNNEOSTM (also known as Imvamune or Imvanex) and ACAM2000, are available in the United States to prevent smallpox (which is a type of orthopox virus).
A close contact is a person who:
compared to other jurisdictions, Washington state has been allotted several hundred courses of the two-dose JYNNEOS vaccine.
The CDC does not believe health care professionals are at high risk for exposure to monkeypox and does not currently recommend vaccination for most medical providers.
Without additional supplies from CDC, Washington state has no plans to hold vaccination clinics or distribute vaccine to providers.
No. Vaccines work differently depending on the virus they are protecting against.
There are no travel restrictions or requirement for the monkeypox vaccine to travel.
For people with disabilities, Web documents in other formats are available on request. To submit a request, please contact us at civil.rights@doh.wa.gov.
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